“They needed a second chance of surviving in this world”

 

marcela.jpg"They used to cry in their sleep. In my mind, I went through a lot of stuff. How could these kids be treated like that in a foster home? 'Grandma, we don't want to go back. We're safe here.' Every night they knelt beside their beds and prayed. I could hear them, and they always prayed for me not to get sick.  
 
"Social Services asked me if I wanted to take custody. They needed a second chance of surviving in this world. So I adopted them on January 4, 2016. Now they’re stable. They know they’re in a safe place. 
 
"I make sure they're in school, that they open the door for a lady or an older gentleman and respect older people. They have their own goals. 'Grandma, we're going to do this when we grow up.'  
 
"I teach them to pray in the morning when they leave for school because you never know if you're coming back. The guardian angel I really trust myself to is Saint Raphael. He's the guardian of the people who go on journeys. When we're going for a walk, my kids say, 'Come on Raphael, let's go for a walk.' When we get home, they always say, 'Thank you Raphael. You brought us home safe and sound.' 
 
"I'm a Native American. I'm a Yaqui. The healers and Jesus are the ones that are making me survive and be a good citizen in this community. If a family member or friend gets hurt, we pray to Our Lady of Guadalupe. If that person gets well, we come and light a candle in the shrine.  
 
"I worked at a casino as a security officer for a lot of years, and one day in 2012, a drunk driver hit me. Every time I look at my grandson, it reminds me of the accident. He was 2 days old. We were driving him home to put up his crib when we were hit. They put pins in my elbow and my ankle and my ribs. They said I was lucky to survive.  
 
"I had to quit my job, but I was given a second opportunity, and I gave my grandkids opportunity so they can learn and they can achieve their goals someday. 
 
"I went through a lot. When I was younger, my husband was deported, so I was left in Guadelupe with two babies and I was three months pregnant. I couldn't get him back. I wasn’t taking the risk of bringing him illegally over the border, so I said, 'You stay.' It wasn't an easy thing to do, but we had our agreement. I raised my daughters by myself. I had to work a lot, and I was grateful for my mom and dad who helped me. 
 
"I don't know where I would be without my home. I said, 'I have to find a place where I can be with the kids. A safe place where I can say, 'This is my home.' The kids know it too, because they say, 'Oh, it's good to be home,' when we go for a walk. This place has helped me because there are no other rents around here that are affordable. It’s a blessing that we found a place here." 

 - Marcela Vega, Nuestra Senora Resident
 

Enterprise remains a proud contributor to the long-term success of Nuestra Senora. Having providing financing during the construction phase, we remain an active partner in the development’s sustainability.  

  • Equity: $8.8 million in Low-Income Housing Tax Credit equity (American Express was the investor) 
  • Debt: $1.3 million loan from Enterprise Community Loan Fund 
  • Transit accessible: A bus stop is walking distance a few blocks away. 
  • Asset management: Through site visits and regular analysis of financial performance, our Asset Management team helps ensure a consistent quality of life for the residents. 
  • Rural and Native American: Numerous Enterprise reports discuss the sustainability of Rural and Native American Housing.  
     

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